Magpie Murders - Anthony Horowitz

Honestly, this novel is a mess of a book.

 

Editor Samantha Ryeland reads a book by her most famous client, mystery writer Alan Convay. The first part of this novel consists of the mystery novel, which Alan Convay has written. But the last part of this fictitious mystery novel is missing and at this point we get thrown into Samanthas narrative, who is trying to find the missing chapters and who has to deal with a whole lot of other problems along the way.

 

Basically this book is two stories in one and let me be upfront, I didn´t enjoy both stories. Alan Convays novel is incredibly boring and when I finally got invested in the narrative of this story, the novel abruptly ends, because the final chapters are missing.

And then I had to endure Samantha´s narrative, an unsympathetic character who turns into an amateur sleuth for no reason at all. Samantha just rubbed me the wrong way with her pathetic whining about her relationsship and she is really full of herself. Towards the end of the novel she comes to the conclusion that only an editor could have solved the mystery that has been laid out in the present narrative. At that point I felt the need to punch her in the face.

 

Both stories get incredibly bogged down by incessant info-dumping. Whether it being the looks of a person, the interior of a house, the never-ending references to Agatha Christie, the author felt the need to provide the reader with too much information. This book could have been shorter and it could have needed a better editor.

 

I listened to the audiobook of Magpie Murders and both narrators, Samantha Bond and Allan Corduner, did a good job with the narration. They were the reason I didn´t DNF the book, but I´m still glad that I got it from my local library via Overdrive.