Lillelara

Lillelara

"A half finished book is, after all, a half finished love affair"
                 - Robert Frobischer (Cloud Atlas)

Reading progress update: I've read 311 out of 311 pages.
Danger Point - Patricia Wentworth

Out of the four Wentworths I have read so far, this is my least favorite. The reasons being:

 

1. The dumb as a doornail main character. God, that woman annoyed the heck out of me.

2. The utterly predictable story. I knew on page 20 how this book would end.

3. Why is this a Miss Silver mystery? She didn´t do anything throughout the whole book, besides knitting a jumper.

 

I still kind of enjoyed this book, because I really like Patricia Wentworths writing style. But overall, this wasn´t a particularly good entry to the series.

 

Book: Read a pastiche, a book authorized by a deceased author’s estate, the 4th book in a series, a book with the word “four” in the title, a book featuring four siblings, or a book with a wreath, pines or fir trees on the cover.

 

Reading progress update: I've read 152 out of 311 pages.
Danger Point - Patricia Wentworth

Out of all the confusion one certainty emerged. Dale had asked her to help him, and she had said she would. She couldn´t go and see Mrs. Silver after all. She would have to go into Ledlington in the morning and ring her up. She needn´t give any reason. She need only say that she was sorry she could not come. Her thoughts went no father than that. She couldn´t go and see Miss Silver, because Dale asked her to help him and she had said yes. She couldn´t go and see Miss Silver because it might be hurting Dale. It - wouldn´t - help - him. It - might - harm - him.

 

Woman, just grow a backbone already!

 

It´s not a good sign that I constantly feel the need to shake the main character to her senses. Honestly, she is such a doormat. 

 

Book: Read a pastiche, a book authorized by a deceased author’s estate, the 4th book in a series, a book with the word “four” in the title, a book featuring four siblings, or a book with a wreath, pines or fir trees on the cover.

 

I made myself some home-made ginger tea ...

... because I am sick at the most inconvenient time of the year. I have to be well again on Friday, this being the day of the last concert of my gospel choir and I have to sing two solos. 

 

So here is my plan for today: I´m snuggling up with a warm blanket and a good book (primarily Wentworth´s "Danger Point")  and I will be drinking a whole lot of the ginger tea I just made for myself (I´m suprised how tasty this tea is). And if I´m not too caught up in my reading, I might try to knock some of the 24 tasks out of the park.  

 

 

I hope you are all feeling well and stay healthy. 

Reading progress update: I've read 80 out of 311 pages.
Danger Point - Patricia Wentworth

"Fact is, Lisle´s a damn bad driver. She might have just panicked and let go. [...]"

 

I feel like Lisle isn´t the sharpest tool in the shed. Or maybe she is just in love and blind to the fact that her husband Dale is a big old jerk. I can´t wait for Miss Silver to make her appearance in the house and hopefully annoy the heck out of Dale.

 

[Source]

 

Book: Read a pastiche, a book authorized by a deceased author’s estate, the 4th book in a series, a book with the word “four” in the title, a book featuring four siblings, or a book with a wreath, pines or fir trees on the cover.

 

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 311 pages.
Danger Point - Patricia Wentworth

You know what: The non-fiction about Chernobyl I´m currently reading is really good, but it makes me so angry that I only can read one chapter at a time, I´m still not in the right head space for Jean Baptist Grenouille and his quest for the perfect scent and I much rather listen to Christie´s "Hercule Poirot Christmas" than actually reading Poirot´s adventure of the Christmas Pudding, so I scratched the latter one from my currently reading list.

 

Which means that I will snuggle up with a big blanket, a huge cup of tea and a Patricia Wentworth novel tonight. 

 

Book: Read a pastiche, a book authorized by a deceased author’s estate, the 4th book in a series, a book with the word “four” in the title, a book featuring four siblings, or a book with a wreath, pines or fir trees on the cover. 

 

 

 

Reading progress update: I've listened 397 out of 397 minutes.
Murder on the Orient Express - Agatha Christie

So good. Rereading this book is always a pleasure

 

Book: Reread a favorite book by a deceased author or from a finished series, or read a book set in Mexico or a book that either has a primarily black and white cover or all the colors (ROYGBIV) on the cover, or a book featuring zombies.

 

 

24 Festive Tasks - Day 16, Task 1: St. Lucia´s Day

Task 1: Famous first words: Tradition has it that the winners of the Nobel Peace Prize are woken up by the St. Lucia maidens, as St. Lucia's Day (Dec. 13) is just three days after the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony and many laureates stay long enough to be able to take in the St. Lucia festivities. Imagine one of your favorite (fictional) characters had won that prize: How would you think (s)he would greet the maidens? (If you've used the Nobel Peace Prize for Door 15, Task 3, this can be the same character, of course … or a different one, just as you wish.)

 

[Source]

 

Mon ami, no, it´s Sweden in December and it´s been an awfully cold night at the place Poirot was staying at. He would say to the Lucia maidens: "Don´t you have central heating in your country? Bah, turn on the heater, s'il vous plaît."

 

Reading progress update: I've read 100 out of 404 pages.
Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy - Serhii Plokhy

Reading about the firefighters and their heroic effort to stop the fire, without knowing about the invisible dangers that´s been lurking behind it, is one of the most harrowing things I have ever read and propbably ever will read. These men are truly unsung heroes.

 

Door 22: Dec. 31 – New Year’s Eve / St. Sylvester’s Day

Book: Read a book about an ending or a new start, where things go BOOM (explodes), with fireworks on the cover, set in medieval times, about the papacy, or where miracles of any sort are performed.

Reading progress update: I've read 14 out of 404 pages.
Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy - Serhii Plokhy

And if the other three reactors of the Chernobyl power plant had been damaged by the explosion of the first, then hardly any living and breathing organism would have remained on the planet

 

I´ve started the first couple of pages of Chernobyl last night and this book, as well-written non-fiction always does, immediately sucked me in. Based upon the very few first pages alone, I think this is going to be a fantastic (and hard-hitting) read. 

 

 

Door 22: Dec. 31 – New Year’s Eve / St. Sylvester’s Day

Book: Read a book about an ending or a new start, where things go BOOM (explodes), with fireworks on the cover, set in medieval times, about the papacy, or where miracles of any sort are performed.

 

Reading progress update: I've read 2 out of 240 pages.
The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding - Agatha Christie

I´ve decided to pick up this collection of five stories, of which I already have read "The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding" last year or the year before. Which isn´t a bad thing at all, because Poirot and his antics about Christmas in an Englisch country manor and (their lack of) radiators is hilarious.

 

Door 20: Dec. 25 – Christmas

Book: Read a Christmas book.

 

Reading progress update: I've read 90 out of 263 pages.
Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (Penguin Essentials) - Patrick Süskind , John E. Woods

At the moment I´m moving through this book at a snails pace. Mainly because I´ve been barely at home and when I´m at home, I´m so exhausted I just want to go to bed. And the story of Jean-Baptiste Grenouille needs a bit of effort from the reader, something which I cannot come up with right now. So this book will go on the backburner for a couple of days. 

 

And now I have to figure out if I´m in the mood for a non-fiction book (Serhii Plokhy´s "Chernobyl") or a (christmas related) mystery as an in between read. 

 

Book: Read a book about tolerance, or outside your comfort zone, or set in Paris (seat of UNESCO).

 

Reading progress update: I've read 224 out of 224 pages.
Japanese Tales of Mystery and Imagination - Rampo Edogawa, James B. Harris, Patricia Welch

The stories towards the end of this collection were not quite as good as the ones in the beginning, but overall I really enjoyed this collection of dark and twisted short stories. I definitely have to check out some of Rampo´s other works. 

 

Book: Read a book by a Korean author or set in Korea, that takes place at sea or on a river, where the plot involves a festival, where the moon or rain plays a pivotal role in the plot, or with rain, water or the moon on the cover.

 

 

 

Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 263 pages.
Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (Penguin Essentials) - Patrick Süskind , John E. Woods

I´m just really in the mood for a reread of this book, which is as weird as it is brilliant.

 

Book: Read a book about tolerance, or outside your comfort zone, or set in Paris (seat of UNESCO).

 

24 Festive Tasks - Day 9, Task 4: World Philosophy Day

Task 4: Did you love or hate the books you had to read for school? Looking back, which ones (good or bad) stand out to you the most?

 

I loved the majority of books I had to read for school. Especially the books we had to read for German class were great. Among my favorites have been Theodor Storms "Der Schimmelreiter", Friedrich Schillers "Kabale und Liebe", "Wilhelm Tell" and "Maria Stuart" (I was a huge Schiller fangirl in school), Friedrich Dürrenmatts "Es geschah am hellichten Tag", the play, and Theodor Fontanes "Unterm Birnbaum". Btw, I´ve read Fontanes "Effi Briest", his most famous book, recently and it was fab as well. 

 

 

There is one book, though, that I absolutely hated reading for Danish class. It´s called "Ægget der voksede" (roughly translated: The growing Egg"). It´s a family saga set in Denmark, but the majority of the book is about potatoes and how they came to Denmark and blablabla. God, this book was the most boring thing I ever had to read and I have never found another book equally as boring as that one. And the worst thing was, I couldn´t DNF or skimread it. My Danish teacher was one of a kind, she really was capable of sensing if someone has read the book or not. 

 

 

 

24 Festive Tasks - Day 7, Task 4: International Day of Tolerance

Task 4: If you were offered an all-expenses-paid trip to one (one only!) of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, which one would you pick (and why)?

 

If someone would pay me the trip (and that someone would make sure that I wouldn´t get Malaria, Dengue or any other kind of tropical disease I can possibly think of), I would love to visit Angkor in Cambodia. I´m completely fascinated by this place and otherwise not being interested in visiting Asia at all, this is the one place I would like to visit to learn more about the history of the Khmer Empire. 

 

 

 

 

Reading progress update: I've read 337 out of 337 pages.
The Key (A Miss Silver Mystery) - Patricia Wentworth

In a tone so far from official that it actually sounded boyish he exclaimed, „Marvellous - isn‘t she!“


Oh yes, Miss Silver most definitely is marvellous. This was such a fun read. 



currently reading

Progress: 188/404pages
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Progress: 113/263pages
Hercule Poirot's Christmas - Agatha Christie, Hugh Fraser